Slow Cake

Feasting is a way of celebrating special events, and many festivals have acquired a constellation of typical dishes. Often these are elaborations of everyday food, tarted up for the occasion. In many parts of Italy (maybe all, but I haven’t been everywhere) no meal is complete without bread, so what better food to make a fuss of.

The Garfagnana has its own special Easter bread called pasimata.

Easter cake at Daniela's shop

The sell-by date is August, but I bet it doesn’t last that long!

 

Paolo Magazzini, the village baker at Petrognola to whom I take my guests for bread lessons, recounted his procedure, the lengthy traditional way.

telling recipe for pasimata

Paolo turns a recipe into a thriller (photo: Alex Entzinger)

You take flour, sugar, butter, eggs, milk and lievito madre (starter dough).

Day 1 morning: mix all ingredients.

12 hours later: add more of the same ingredients except the starter dough.

Day 2 morning: add more of the same ingredients except the starter dough.

12 hours later: add sultanas, aniseed, vin santo (sweet Tuscan dessert wine), chestnut-flavoured liqueur.

Day 3 morning: light wood-fired oven.

Bake a batch of bread.

Put pasimata dough in round tins.

After one hour, take bread out. Oven will be exactly the right temperature for pasimata.

Bake pasimata for 40 minutes.

Remove from oven and eat enthusiastically.

sliced pasimata of the garfagnana

Bread dressed up like cake

The long rise over 48 hours allows time for the development of exceptional flavours and aromas.  Today many people make a ‘fast cake’ version in an hour by substituting baking powder for sourdough starter. Next Easter I’m going to organise a blind tasting of the slow and fast versions.

I didn’t ask Paolo for the quantity of each ingredient, since I can get my fix from him. For those not so lucky, here’s a similar recipe from Castiglione in Garfagnana, a walled town which during the Renaissance was batted back and forth like a ping-pong ball between Lucca and Modena. Perhaps they consoled themselves between battles by eating pasimata.

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